Seabrook, WA         360.986.0325

Clam Digging

in Grays Harbor County

Now offering Guided Clam Digs!
$55 per person, $65 with hip-wader rental
Book your dig here -                                                  
 Participation is limited to 10 total, so be quick to schedule, or you'll miss out! Guided digs start at Buck's Bikes two hours before low tide and last no longer than three hours. All equipment is included in the price of the guided dig, except for clamming licenses.

Current Razor Clam Season Information

Information below from WADFW site 

Tentative Razor Clam Openings

No digging is allowed before noon during digs in October, November and December where low tide occurs in the afternoon or evening.

  • October 26, Saturday, 5:59 pm, 0.0 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • October 27, Sunday, 6:47 pm, -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • October 28, Monday, 7:33 pm, -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • October 29, Tuesday, 8:18 pm, -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • October 30, Wednesday, 9:03 pm, -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • October 31, Thursday, 9:50 pm, -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • November 1, Friday, 10:38 pm, -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • November 11, Monday, 5:51 pm, 0.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • November 12, Tuesday, 6:27 pm, -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • November 13, Wednesday, 7:03 pm, -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • November 14, Thursday, 7:41 pm, -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • November 15, Friday, 8:22 pm, -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • November 16, Saturday, 9:08 pm, -0.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • November 17, Sunday, 9:59 pm, -0.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • November 24, Sunday, 4:47 pm, -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • November 25, Monday, 5:34 pm, -1.0 feet; Long Beach Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • November 26, Tuesday, 6:18 pm, -1.3 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • November 27, Wednesday, 7:02 pm, -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • November 28, Thursday, 7:44 pm, -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • November 29, Friday, 8:29 pm, -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • November 30, Saturday, 9:10 pm, -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • December 10, Tuesday, 5:28 pm, -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • December 11, Wednesday, 6:06 pm, -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • December 12, Thursday, 6:45 pm, -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • December 13, Friday, 7:26 pm, -1.0 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • December 14, Saturday, 8:08 pm, -1.0 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • December 15, Sunday, 8:53 pm, -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • December 16, Monday, 9:41 pm, -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • December 23, Monday, 4:35 pm, -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • December 26, Thursday, 6:47 pm, -1.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • December 27, Friday, 7:26 pm, -0.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

  • December 28, Saturday, 8:05 pm, -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

  • December 29, Sunday, 8:43 pm, -0.2 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks

There will be terrific razor clam digging on the other coastal beaches in the months ahead as well, added Ayres. Final approval of the tentatively scheduled openings in October, November and December will depend on whether results of marine toxin tests show the clams are safe to eat. 

"Razor clam digs are a major source of livelihood for coastal communities, bringing out hundreds of thousands of tourists each year to enjoy all we have to offer, including terrific nature, food, entertainment and fun on the beach for the whole family," said Andi Day, Executive Director at Long Beach Peninsula Visitors Bureau. "We value and appreciate WDFW's work to manage this terrific resource for our communities." 

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2019-20 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov and from license vendors around the state.

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container. WDFW is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting and perpetuating fish, wildlife and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing, hunting and other outdoor recreation opportunities. 

Guided Dig!

Guided Dig!

Guided Dig!

You will need:

  • Clamming License 

  • Clam Gun or Shovel 

  • Seperate Containers for Each Clam Limit (15 clams)

  • Boots, Raingear, Lights (if it's an evening dig)

  • Somewhere to Clean Your Clams

  • A Tasty Recipe to Cook up Your Catch!

 

Where do I get my Clamming license?

Where do I get my Clamming license?

The easiest way to get your license is in person at the You and I Market (the gas station) in Pacific Beach, just a mile and a half up the road! Check out the map on the right. The Clamming only license cost $15 and you'll have it in five minutes and in person when you get it there.

 

 You can also get your license online here:

But it takes ten days to receive.

To You & I Market from Buck's Bikes

Who Needs a License? What are the rules?

Everyone 15 years or older needs to have a license. Persons 14 years or younger may dig under a licensed adult in a 1:1 ratio, or have their own license. 

There are many licenses you can get through DFW. The primary ones are:​

  • Three Day Razor Clam - $9.70

  • Annual Razor Clam - $14.10

  • Shellfish/Seaweed - $17.40

  • Combination Licenses - $55.35

Yes there are others, but these are the primary ones folks use for clam digging. 

If you are digging for a disabled person you must have a designated harvester companion card issued by WDFW if using another harvester to assist them with their catch.

All information is available in a pdf document here:

Pro Tip: Search on the page "clam" to find everything easier. 

• Razor Clams may only be taken by hand, hand-operated shovel, or tube with a minimum outside diameter of 4" (4" x 3" if elliptical).

• All clams dug are part of digger’s limit - you may not return any razor clams to the beach or water.

• There is no sharing of container for limits. Each digger must have a separate container for their limit.

• It is illegal to drive any vehicle or to lead or ride a horse on razor clam beds (westerly of a line 150' water-ward of the extreme upper limit of the hard sand area). Pressure from weight of vehicles and digging action of horses’ hooves cause clam mortality.

• The person with a disability for whom razor clams are being dug must be in line of sight of the designated harvester or within ¼ mile of the digging site. Both the digger and the person with a disability must be licensed. The person with a disability must have a designated harvester companion card. The designated harvester must have the designated harvester companion card in their possession while assisting the person with a disability.

What gear do I need? Where do I get it?

 

To be successful in your clam dig, you will need:

  • Clam Gun or Shovel

  • Boots, hip-waders, chest-waders or just crummy shoes you don't mind getting wrecked! 

  • Container for clam limit, net, bag, bucket, pockets?

  • Lights, especially if it's an evening dig! 

  • And of course, Your License! 

Here at the shop we have everything you need, except the license! We sell guns, shovels, bags, nets, lights, and even boots. We also rent equipment! 

RENTALS AVAILABLE

PVC Clam Gun or Steel Clam Shovel - $10

Steel T-Handle Clam Gun - $15

Stainless Steel/PVC "Claminator" Clam Gun - $20

We rent by 24 hr periods, typically asking equipment be returned at 4:00pm so as to make enough time for the next customer to come and rent 

I have the Gear, how do I use it?

Be in the Right Place at the Right Time:

     Clam digging is restricted to specific beaches on the coast. Check out this map for the beaches. Clam dig tides are low tides, and the lower the tide, the more area will be available. Minus tides are best, plan on being there two hours before peak low tide. When swells are lower, clams are likely to be closer to the surface, and therefore easier to detect and dig.

Find a Clam:

      Search the sand for a "show", produced by clams near the surface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Shows are found most commonly by one of two methods:

  1. Looking for round dimples in the sand

  2. Pounding a shovel, or stomping feet

     Occasionally, if you're lucky and watching carefully, you can pick them out as they feed. Commonly known as "necking" this behavior causes very small "V" shaped breaks in the receding surf and clams can be easily pinpointed.

What to Use:

     Clam guns are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. You usually don't get too dirty/sandy using a clam gun, but you can slice through a clam easily if you're not careful.

     Shovels are also inexpensive but can be faster. A little harder to use, you will get pretty sandy as you will find yourself  down on a knee and reaching into the sand (sometimes up to your shoulder!) for your catch.

Start Digging!:

     

     Razor clams dig fast and so should you! But dig carefully as they have a thin shell and you can rip through a clam very easily. (They aren't call "razors" for nothing)

Regulations:

  • Each digger 14 years and older must have a license as shown on the page here. Diggers under 14 years may dig with one adult who has a license (in a 1:1 ratio), or must have a license themselves. 

  • The first 15 clams must be retained regardless of size or damage.

  • One limit per digger, per container. Each clam digger must have their own container to hold their own limit. No one may possess more than one limit of clams while in the harvest area except under a Disabled Clam Digging Permit.

  • Razor clams may be taken by hand, shovel, or cylindrical gun or tube. The opening of the gun/tube must be circular or elliptical with the circular opening having a minimum outside diameter of 4 inches and the elliptical opening having a minimum outside diameter dimension of 4 inches long and 3 inches wide.

  • It is illegal to drive any vehicle or to lead or ride a horse on razor clam beds (westerly of a line 150' water-ward of the extreme upper limit of the hard sand area). Pressure from weight of vehicles and digging action of horses’ hooves cause clam mortality.

Digging with a Clam Gun:

STEP ONE:

Place the clam gun off-center of the show with extra room on the oceanside. Shows are typically not directly above the clam and are at a slight angle towards the ocean.

STEP TWO:

With the air hole on the clam gun open, drive the gun straight down.

Pro Tip: don't rock the gun back and forth, you could break it!

STEP THREE:

Place your thumb of finger over the air hole. Lift the gun with the column of sand slowly and with your legs. This can be fairly heavy and it's important that you use proper lifting technique.

STEP FOUR: 

Remove your thumb from the air hole and shake the sand out of the gun.

STEP FIVE:

Collect your Prize!

Digging with a Clam Shovel:

STEP ONE:

Insert shovel straight down (6inches deep) perpendicular to the clams position in relation to the beach.

STEP TWO:

Push the shovel handle forward using the leverage of the shovel to pinch the clams neck. This inhibits their ability to dig.

STEP THREE:

Slide the shovel out and replace it with your hand.

STEP FOUR:

Carefully detect the clams shell and dig with your hand to remove it.

STEP FIVE:

Collect your prize!

 

I've got my clams, how do I clean them?

There are a few methods to cleaning clams with no wrong way (unless you find you are wasting meat!). The methods we show are a starting point that will provide the most amount of clam meat ready to be cooked. The method we show requires: boiling water, cold water or ice water in a bowl, scissors, a sink, container for collecting cleaned clams, and somewhere to toss the unwanted parts.

First you will want to rinse your clams of sand as this will make the cleaning easier.

Place the clams in a colander and place the colander in the sink.

Use your fingers to pull the clam body from the shell.

Put the edge of your scissors in under the zipper and snip upward toward the end of the neck.

Use your fingers to grab the digger and gills.

After rinsing, the body is ready to eat.

Insert the scissors into the middle part of the digger.

Pull the digger apart so that it lays flat.

Pour boiling water over the clams, then IMMEDIATELY rinse them with cold water, or transfer to ice water bowl.

Snip off the tough part of the neck just below the valve. Get close to the end.

Make sure your scissors go into the lower chamber of the neck to save time. If you missed it, put the scissors back in and cut through the lower chamber. Continue all the way through the end of the neck.

Squeeze gently and pull to separate the digger from the body.

Snip at an angle across the end of the digger.

Cut all the way through the end of the digger, keeping in the middle so that the digger will lay flat for cooking.

Pull the dark material from the digger. Only remove the dark material.

Gently pull the digger flat and rinse. There will be soft material that remains on the digger as shown. The digger is now ready to eat.

 

How do I cook my clams?

There are many ways to cook up your razor clams and they are all delicious! Below you will find links to a few of our favorites, plus a link to a WDFW page that has even more recipes if you're looking for something more than fritters and chowder. 

First up is classic Clam Chowder. You can't go wrong here! The two variations just have to do with cooking time, either in a crockpot, the other using a saucepan. 

Pro Tip: For a more hearty chowder, chop your clams into 1/4 dime size using scissors or a hand chopper. 

Next is the other classic for Razor Clams, and that is fried! By far one of the simplest methods of cooking up your limit that doesn't take too long and can easily be enjoyed by all!

Pro Tip: Whatever you do, don't overcook them! 

A different take on cooking razor clams is the Clam Cake, much like a crab cake except different meat, of course!

Pro Tip: Make the cake a bit thinner, now you have a burger! Serve on a toasted bun with a spread of mayo, slice of tomato, and lettuce

Crockpot Chowder

Crockpot Clam Chowder

Saucepan Chowder

Saucepan Chowder

Fried Razor Clams

Fried Razor Clams

Razor Clam Cakes

Razor Clam Cakes

Again, those are a few of our favorites. If you are looking for even more recipes, check out the WDFW website below for even more recipes and variety!

RIDE NOW

360-986-0325

Fat Bike on Seabrook Beach